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WHAT IS SAFEGUARDING

The Care Act statutory guidance defines adult safeguarding as:

Protecting an adult or young person's right to live in safety, free from abuse, bullying  and neglect. It is about people and organisations working together to prevent and stop both the risks and experience of abuse or neglect, while at the same time making sure that the adult or young person's well-being is promoted including, where appropriate, having regard to their views, wishes, feelings and beliefs in deciding on any action. This must recognise that some individuals do sometimes have complex interpersonal relationships and may be ambivalent, unclear or unrealistic about their personal circumstances. 

 

This definition hints at the challenges of safeguarding, but it is important to be clear about which adult or young person we are discussing. A Local Authority, Organisation or Club must act when it has ‘reasonable cause to suspect that a person within its area (whether or not ordinarily resident there):

  1. Has needs for care and support (whether or not the organisation is meeting any of those needs),

  2. Is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect, and as a result of those needs is unable to protect himself or herself against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.’ (Care Act 2014, section 42)

So safeguarding is for people who, because of issues such as dementia, learning disability, mental ill-health, substance abuse, lifestyle issues, have care and support needs that may make them more vulnerable to abuse or neglect.

 

Who is at a higher risk?

  1. People with care and support needs, such as older or young people or people with disabilities, are more likely to be abused or neglected. They may be seen as an easy target and may be less likely to identify abuse themselves or to report it.

  2. People with communication difficulties can be particularly at risk because they may not be able to alert others.

 

Sometimes individuals may not even be aware that they are being abused, and this is especially likely if they have a cognitive impairment. Abusers may try to prevent access to the person they abuse.

GEDLING INDOOR BOWLS CLUB RECOGNISES IT'S RESPONSIBILITIES IN THIS AREA, THERFORE WE NOW HAVE TWO SAFEGUARDING OFFICERS IN PLACE.

(EDDIE & JULIE JONES)

THEIR ROLE IS TO SUPPORT AND ADVISE, NEEDY OR CONCERNED MEMBERS.

THEIR CONTACT DETAILS ARE SHOWN BELOW.

IN THE EVENT YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS IN NEED OF SUPPORT, ADVICE OR HELP IN ANY WAY PLEASE CONTACT THEM USING THE SPECIFIC EMAIL ADDRESS BELOW.

ALSO PLEASE BE ASSURED, ALL CONTACTS ARE TREATED WITH THE UTMOST OF CONFIDENTIALITY AND ARE ONLY SEEN, DISCUSSED AND MANAGED BY THESE OFFICERS.

THE MANAGEMENT & BOWLS COMMITEE HAS NO INVOLMENT, INFORMATION OR JURISDICTION OVER THESE MATTERS, UNLESS LEGALLY BOUND TO DO SO.

Eddie Jones.jpg
Eddie Jones
Safeguarding Officer
Julie Jones.jpg
Julie Jones
Safeguarding Officer
To contact either one of these officers, please use this email address
gibc.safe@outlook.com
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